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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The decocking lever, out of the box, was very hard to operate (that's why Gun Tests mag gave it a "Don't Buy" rating - otherwise they liked the gun). I tried lubing it. If it helped I couldn't tell it. So I just tried rotating it back and forth 50 times. Helped a bit. In terms of everyday carry I'm leery, should an emergency arise wherein I have to draw and, God forbid, fire, I don't want to have to fiddle with the decocker. My question is this: Should I just leave it off and the hammer down in a Wright Leather Works Predator holster OWB that covers the trigger? I've been doing some internet reading and some people say it's safe (a la Glock) while others have concerns. So I thought I'd ask Bersa owners, some of whom carry daily.
 

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Not an unusual problem for the be Bersa 380. It has extremely tight tolerances in that are, and are seldom a problem big enough to have addressed by a gunsmith. Took me several sessions of watching a movie or some rare TV program to get mine broke in a few years back. Get a good Teflon Lube and continue to work the decocker putting a drop of lube on it ever 25 or so cycles of working it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks, 9UC. That's reassuring. Can you tell me where to put the lube? When you mentioned "several sessions" I assumed you were working the decocker while watching.
 

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Actually it's one of the few times that I over lube, both inside the slide and all around the decocker lever itself. Yes, I generally do it while occupying myself watching some useless TV program.
 

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I agree with 9UC about lube and work it! I've heard many folks across many different firearms that advise working the difficult mechanism and keep it lubed. This seems a good and lo-cost suggestion - and it even works? What could be better?

As far as safety 'OFF' and one in the chamber, IMO, as long as the trigger is covered and you aren't a stunt-man carrying the pistol while doing death-defying stunts, you'll be fine. That's how I carry my Beretta(s), my LCP, Bersa AND Glocks. Gun in a quality holster, trigger covered and finger OFF THE TRIGGER is OK by me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks, all of you, for the comments and advice. When I cleaned both my BT380 and Glock 19 yesterday I took the Bersa slide into the house from the garage (my workshop) and lubed and worked the decocker. It definitely got easier to rotate; regardless, I've been carrying it with hammer down and the decocker off.

When I reassembled the Bersa I had trouble mounting the slide. Turned out I wasn't using enough strength to pull it back far enough. Unlike the Glock's slide, where you merely engage the rails and with almost no effort, move the slide back until it seats itself. Once I figured out the drill on the Bersa I no longer had a problem.

I think I'm going to get a 9UC and sell the Glock.
 

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Thanks, all of you, for the comments and advice...............I think I'm going to get a 9UC and sell the Glock.
Not a bad idea at all, I've got two of the 9UCs and if it were not for the hand problems, I'd be carrying one. If all oes well, IK may even have a 9HC in a couple of weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
"9HC," what is it? Not familiar with that model. And how does it differ from the 9UC?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks, 9UC. I have a Glock 19 (15+1) but the 9HC compares more accurately to the Glock 17.

9HC - G17 - G19

Bbl 4.25 4.48 4.01
Mag 17+1 17+1 15+1
Wt. 30.6oz 25.6oz 23.65oz

Possibly the Bersa weighs slightly more due to its alloy frame. But the Bersa should be more inherently accurate in SA due to a lighter trigger pull. Of course someone with strong hands this might not be an issue, as opposed to older shooters with reduced hand strength.
 

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I have no problem with the idea of carrying a BT with the hammer down on a live round and the safety off. The looong DA trigger pull is safe enough. No different from carrying a 38 S&W snubbie revolver … even in a pocket. However, when I get my new BT Plus, I will work that safety until it smooths out notably, and most likely carry it with the safety on. Personally I hate DA trigger pulls because I can't hit the broad side of a barn that way and will only use that whenever ABSOLUTELY necessary and at less than 3 yards …. otherwise it will be thumb-cock the hammer and go SA on the first shot. So, for me, it will most likely require two actions … disengage the safety and thumb-cock the hammer. :)
 

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I have no problem with the idea of carrying a BT with the hammer down on a live round and the safety off. The looong DA trigger pull is safe enough. No different from carrying a 38 S&W snubbie revolver … even in a pocket. However, when I get my new BT Plus, I will work that safety until it smooths out notably, and most likely carry it with the safety on. Personally I hate DA trigger pulls because I can't hit the broad side of a barn that way and will only use that whenever ABSOLUTELY necessary and at less than 3 yards …. otherwise it will be thumb-cock the hammer and go SA on the first shot. So, for me, it will most likely require two actions … disengage the safety and thumb-cock the hammer. :)
Some folks apparently get pretty good with double action triggers. Some say pull straight through with steady pressure and others say pull to the point you know the trigger breaks and then become more delicate. If you need the pistol in a great hurry, your target will probably be pretty darn close and you will be pointing, not aiming. If not close, you will have time to thumb the hammer back. I bought a thunder a month or two ago and like everyone else I thought the decocker was horrendously hard to pivot. I pulled the mechanism (videos on youtube) and there were no burrs or grit so I cleaned and lubed it before reinstalling it. On the positive side, I feel this pistol is best carried with a round in the chamber then decocked and the safety moved back up to fire position. Pushing the decocker down accidentally with your thumb in a self defense situation would not be good with a thunder. A stiffer decocker lever makes that more difficult to do and it is really not necessary to decock one handed as that is done before holstering. When the pistol is decocked the hammer is not sitting on the firing pin as it would be when someone decocks with the trigger and thumb pressure on the hammer (not recommended). My HK USP has three positions, SAFE being up like a 1911, FIRE in the middle and DECOCK in the down position. On the HK the lever comes back up to FIRE automatically once you let go of it. If I were to accidentally push the lever down it would not affect anything as it is already carried in the decock position and is ready to fire in double action. I prefer that but then the Thunder does not cost what an HK does. Because of the way the Thunder safety works, I much prefer it be a bit stiff. After all you should only be using it once every time you put the pistol in its holster. I personally believe holsters should be molded to guarantee that the safety lever stays where you want it while holstered. On a 1911 I would want the holster to make it impossible for the safety to move down into FIRE position accidentally because of body motion throughout the day. On my HK I'd want it to hod the lever in SAFE of FIRE, depending if I wanted to carry cocked and locked or decocked with double action. On a Thunder I would want it to stop the lever from moving down into decock/safe position. Who wants to pull a pistol expecting a long DA trigger pull to find the lever shifted into SAFE and nothing happens when the trigger is pulled. That stiff lever is your friend as long as it functions.
 
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